Where did Fountains Begin?

Fountains Begin? 6492436166.jpg Where did Fountains Begin? A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to supply drinkable water, as well as for decorative purposes.

The central purpose of a fountain was originally strictly functional. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, from aqueducts or springs in the vicinity. Up until the nineteenth, fountains had to be higher and closer to a water supply, including aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to take advantage of gravity which fed the fountains. Fountains were not only utilized as a water source for drinking water, but also to decorate homes and celebrate the designer who created it. Bronze or stone masks of animals and heroes were frequently seen on Roman fountains. Throughout the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners incorporated fountains to create mini variations of the gardens of paradise. To show his prominence over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries manufactured baroque decorative fountains to exalt the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the location where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

Urban fountains created at the end of the 19th century served only as decorative and celebratory ornaments since indoor plumbing provided the necessary drinking water. Amazing water effects and recycled water were made possible by switching the power of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern fountains are used to embellish public spaces, honor individuals or events, and enrich recreational and entertainment events.

Garden Water Fountain Builders Through History

Garden Water Fountain Builders Through HistoryGarden Water Fountain Builders History 30053588370562.jpg Multi-talented individuals, fountain artists from the 16th to the late 18th century frequently functioned as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one person. Throughout the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci illustrated the artist as an imaginative wizard, creator and scientific expert. He methodically recorded his findings in his now much celebrated notebooks about his studies into the forces of nature and the attributes and motion of water. Early Italian water feature builders altered private villa configurations into amazing water displays complete with emblematic meaning and natural elegance by combining creativity with hydraulic and gardening talent. The humanist Pirro Ligorio, celebrated for his virtuosity in archeology, architecture and garden design, delivered the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli. Other water feature engineers, masterminding the extraordinary water marbles, water features and water humor for the many estates near Florence, were well-versed in humanistic subjects and classical scientific texts.
Rome’s Ingenious Water Transport Systems Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct founded in Rome, started supplying the many people living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had relied on natural springs up until then.... read more


Select from Many Exterior Wall Fountain Styles Small patios or courtyards are an ideal place to set up wall fountains since they add style to an area with limited space.When looking at the many types of outdoor wall fountains available including traditional, antique, contemporary, or Asian, you are certain to find one most suitable to your design ideas.... read more


What Are Garden Water fountains Manufactured From? Most contemporary garden fountains come in metal, although various other types exist.Those made from metals have clean lines and unique sculptural elements, and are flexible enough to fit any budget and decor.... read more


A Short History of Early Water Garden Fountains The water from rivers and other sources was originally delivered to the residents of nearby towns and municipalities via water fountains, whose design was primarily practical, not aesthetic.... read more